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Mark Zuckerberg

Latest Headlines

Latest Headlines

Zuckerberg's Facebook launches TIP with Nokia, SK, DT and others to 'accelerate' 5G network designs

BARCELONA, Spain-- Facebook used the opening day of Mobile World Congress here to introduce the Telecom Infra Project (TIP), an ambitious, engineering-centric effort to bring mobile tech companies together to develop new technologies "and reimagine traditional approaches to building and deploying" networks.

Samsung's 'Unpacked' event was about much more than the Galaxy S7

BARCELONA, Spain-- As expected, Samsung attracted a huge crowd to watch it unveil its new flagship smartphones, the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge. But the company clearly has some other things on its mind as well.

5G moves into high gear at MWC 2016, but IoT will also be top of mind

If you are heading to Barcelona, Spain, this weekend to attend the Mobile World Congress 2016 conference, be prepared for a 5G fest. Operators from all across the globe are jockeying for a lead in the 5G game by announcing upcoming trials and collaborations. Vendors are conducting 5G demos and talking about their 5G roadmaps. And everyone is trying to figure out the best way to prepare for 5G while at the same time still monetizing their current investments in LTE.

Facebook planning dedicated video site that could challenge AT&T, Verizon's Go90

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg said that the company is working to create a dedicated video service that would give videos a more prominent position on the social networking site. Although details of the plan remain unclear, it could put Facebook into more direct competition with other Internet video providers like Google, as well as wireless operators like Verizon that are pushing their video services.

Facebook's Internet.org connects 9M people, but net neutrality questions lead to 'Free Basics' name change

Facebook's Internet.org continues to work to connect more and more people across the globe to the Internet-- according to the Wall Street Journal, more than 9 million people across the world have connected to the Internet through the program-- but that effort is now running into some static. Specifically, Facebook has changed the name of the program to "Free Basic by Facebook," likely to address concerns over whether the program runs afoul of the principles of net neutrality.

Facebook's first Internet.org drone prepares for take-off

Facebook's aerospace team in the UK has completed construction of its first full-scale aircraft, called the Aquila, as part of its Internet.org effort. Aquila is a solar-powered unmanned plane designed to beam down Internet connectivity from the sky.

Facebook jumps into the Internet of Things, lets Messenger interact with other apps and businesses

Facebook unveiled a new software-development kit for its Parse mobile development platform that enables developers to create apps that share data with connected devices. Meanwhile, Faceook also announced an update to its Messenger app called Messenger Platform that will let the messaging app be used to create and share content independent of the News Feed.

Google, Facebook willing to work together to expand Internet access despite differing approaches

BARCELONA, Spain--Google and Facebook executives said that they are willing to work together to expand access to the Internet and basic web services, despite their contrasting visions for doing so.

Facebook CEO touts Internet.org progress, trumpets success of free tier of service

BARCELONA, Spain--A year after asking mobile operators to support Facebook's Internet.org effort, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg returned to the Mobile World Congress keynote stage here to tout the success of the program and to reiterate his call for more operators to participate. He also made a point of praising wireless operators' work in connecting new users to the Internet, noting that "it's really important not to lose sight of the fact that it's the operators that are driving this."

Facebook's Zuckerberg explains why users were forced to download separate Messenger app

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained that the social networking giant forced users of its main mobile application to download a separate Messenger app for messaging because it felt that apps should do one thing well and users could be better served by having a standalone messaging app that performed that function well.