Topic:

App Discovery

Latest Headlines

Latest Headlines

Appnique, Enola Labs, Gummicube shape the keys to boosting an app's visibility

App discoverability often challenges developers. And as more apps become available, many developers are considering innovative solutions to ensure consumers can discover their offerings quickly and easily.

HotelTonight, Chimani, Quick Left and other developers rally around Google's app streaming and indexing

Late last year, Google announced it would make search results and advertising on mobile devices more relevant by indexing Android apps with or without corresponding Web content. Google also began allowing users to "stream" apps that are not already installed on users' mobile devices. The move raises an important question for developers: Should they support this new technology?

Quixey: Consumers want the functionality of mobile apps, convenience of mobile Web

Mobile consumers are divided on which they prefer, mobile apps or mobile Web, according to a recent report from Quixey. The firm commissioned a survey of about 1,000 people to get an idea of how they prefer to use mobile internet.

What I learned by editing FierceDeveloper

Only now can the truth be told: I've never played Angry Birds. The same goes for most mobile games, other than the ones I've had to help my three children try to figure out. I do not own an Apple Watch, and have no intention of buying a similar wearable anytime soon. The apps I check most often are the same big monoliths that everyone else uses: Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and (because I do a lot of reading) Pocket. How on Earth did a guy like me get a gig running FierceDeveloper?

The Coca-Cola moment: PlayRaven, Etermax, Maxplay outline strategies for making apps, games stand out in 2016

Mobile game developers have all kinds of heroes and role models who have shown them how to be successful, but Lasse Seppänen may be one of the first to publicly salute the founder of Coca-Cola, John Pemberton, as an inspiration.

Be honest: You wish you'd been the developer who made Rumblr

Looking back-- and we're only talking a about a week, here-- the only thing Rumblr would have needed was to somehow fake getting put in Apple's "Featured" section of the App Store to become the ultimate envy of the developer community.

Research Now: 92% say they plan to use more apps in the future

The good news: 92 percent of consumers expect to use apps more or the same in the future. The bad news: They'll only use new apps on average 4.5 times before deciding to stop using it due to boredom or lack of perceived value. These were just some of the data points from a survey of 1,000 mobile app users conducted by Research Now for Localytics in October.

How developers should respond to 'The Greatest Apps Ever' lists

I have nothing against Snapchat, even though I'm so old I've discovered that none of my friends use it. I'm a regular Uber-er, and have recently started using Duolingo to teach myself Italian. There comes a point, though, when even the best apps can be a little over-celebrated.

Fiksu: Getting a loyal app audience has reached the $4 threshold

Spending on mobile advertising to attract an app customer with staying power has reached an all-time high of $4, according to Fiksu. The company's App Store Competitive Index, which tracks the average aggregate daily downloads of the top 200 free iOS apps, looks at the cost per loyal user (CPLU) on a regular basis. It also publishes a Cost-Per-Install (CPI) Index that looks at initial user acquisition costs.

Evernote's Phil Libin has a theory about apps every developer should ponder

If you work for a technology success story long enough, you're bound to eventually get the question Phil Libin recently struggled to answer: "What are your favorite apps?" The former CEO of Evernote was a guest in an episode of the Tim Ferriss Show podcast, and he was quizzed about his personal preferences on all manner of things. When it came to mobile apps, though, he sounded stumped. In fact, he gently suggested the death knell for apps is nearer than developers may realize.