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What if the mobile game blockbusters never leave the app store charts?

I am trying to remember the last hit song that I wanted desperately to stop playing on the radio, but in an age of streaming music the only thing that comes back to me are the really old ones. When I was a teenager, for example, there was "The Sign," from Ace of Base, which enjoyed at least 14 weeks in the No. 1 spot on my local station. Even the DJs seemed sick of it, but in the grand scheme of things it's nothing like the enduring success that certain mobile games enjoy.

The secrets of developer success in the anonymity app market

Though not formally recognized as a category on major app stores, Secret and Whisper are among the most talked-about anonymity apps. However, many other apps have been launched and more are likely to come--and their motivations are not all the same.

MediaBrix: 'Emotional breakthrough moments' dramatically increase video ad views

Letting a mobile game player who runs out of lives watch an ad in exchange for continuing to the next level is an "emotional breakthrough moment" that developers can use to drive revenue, a report from MediaBrix suggests.

How developers reacted to Apple's 64-bit app ultimatum

iOS developers now know what they'll be doing over the upcoming holiday season: making sure their current and future apps are able to support 64-bit computing based on a strict commandment from Apple.

The Unity sell-off rumors explained

The comments from "ZenGarden" are not particularly well-worded, but they show just how easy it is for rumors--in this case, a potential sale of the mobile gaming tool provider Unity--can turn into crazy speculation.

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FierceWireless

As T-Mobile US and AT&T Mobility continue to duel over potential changes to the FCC's data roaming rules, a filing by an economics professor in support of T-Mobile's position reveals that in 2013, T-Mobile paid an average 30 cents per MB for data roaming data in the U.S.

FierceCable

FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is considering the expansion of his commission's authority over U.S. broadband, but is also contemplating a position of standing out of the way when it comes to paid prioritization deals signed between ISPs and content companies.