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Report: Average age of a mobile gamer has dropped seven years since 2013

The average age of a mobile game user is 27 years old, or seven years younger than a year ago, based on research recently published by EEDAR. The mobile analytics firm's 2014 Deconstructing Mobile & Tablet Gaming Report is based upon a consumer survey of 3,500 North American people who said they played a mobile game within the past three months.

What impressed (and failed to impress) at Samsung Developer Conference 2014

Samsung tried to accomplish a lot with its recent developer conference--new tools for wearable computing, the smart home, healthcare apps and more. It's probably no surprise that not all of it resonated with its intended audience.

What Apple should look for in its Apple Watch evangelist

Call me crazy, but I thought Apple already had an evangelist for its forthcoming Apple Watch, and his name is Jony Ive. Nonetheless, the company is looking to hire someone to take Ive's show on the road.

What app developers can do to move push notifications forward

Breaking news about a celebrity scandal. A new request to connect on LinkedIn. An alert about a flash sale at a local retailer. Push notifications could include content like this and a lot more, but developers may occasionally wonder whether it's worth building them into the app experience or not.

Size matters: Study shows bigger screens lead to greater app usage

Smartphones with screens of 5.5 inches generate more minutes in app usage than smaller devices, according to a joint report released by Mobidia Technology and IHS. The two firms assessed more than 25 different smartphone models from Apple, HTC, Samsung and Sony with screen sizes ranging from 3.5 to 5.7 inches model ages of one to four years.

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FierceTelecom

During its November open meeting on Friday, the FCC issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) related to the proposed transition large service providers are making from traditional TDM to IP, with an eye on consumers and small businesses that rely on services that may not be supported following a transition.

FierceWirelessTech

The vendor supplying up to 10,000 802.11ac access points for New York City's LinkNYC is Ruckus Wireless, the same company that is supplying Wi-Fi gear for cities like San Francisco and San Jose, Calif., albeit on a much smaller scale, sources close to the matter say.