Shane Schick

Biography for Shane Schick

Shane Schick is a writer, editor and speaker who helps people create value with information technology. Besides editing FierceDeveloper, he is a technology columnist with Yahoo Finance, and the editor of CommerceLab and Allstream’s expertIP online community . Shane was previously IT World Canada’s Vice-President, Content & Community (Editor-in-Chief), leading a digital-first strategy that included a transition from print publications to online portals and magazines. Shane regularly speaks to CIOs and other technology professionals about how they can contribute to organizational success and comments on technology news and stories for a variety of TV programs.

Articles by Shane Schick

Why developers should carefully watch what Twitter does with Cover

Maybe it's because I work in publishing, but I get e-mails from search engine optimization firms all the time, and the subject line is almost always the same. "1st page of Google guaranteed!," they promise, meaning that if you use their services, your firm's website is more likely to be found by potential customers online. Good SEO is hugely powerful, and in the mobile world, the best equivalent may be what just happened between Twitter and Cover.

The app spam fallout: How developers will need to rethink SMS

Encouraging the take-up of social networking, messaging and gaming apps is one thing, but some app providers are involved in "growth hacking"--achieved through mass SMS app promotion invitations sent on behalf of users who install the apps. Mobile security firm AdaptiveMobile recently took a closer look at this trend and how different strategies are playing out.

Crittercism: Few apps can offer 99% uptime

Nearly half of all mobile apps can't reach the gold standard of 99 percent uptime, according to Crittercism. The company recently released its Mobile Experience Benchmark Report, which looked at a staggering 3 billion events a day over the course of one month.

Facebook ends in-app chat, and developers have lots to say

Developers, like many consumers, would like to have a little chat with Facebook regarding a recent decision about its Messenger app.

Don't worry, the best app developers won't live with their moms forever

In the countercultural 1960s, the catchphrase among Flower Children used to be "turn on, tune in, drop out." Today, it might better be described as "turn on, tune in, make apps." A recent post on the Harvard Business Review blog explored the dark side of self-taught entrepreneurialism. What happens, for example, when young people pin their hopes on becoming an overnight app store hit and let their homework slide?

Universal app approach has Microsoft Windows devs intrigued

Even Microsoft might be surprised to learn that developers on Twitter were almost universally positive about its "universal app" plans.

No coding required: The rise of tools for non-developers

While many traditional developers continue to come from a technical background with knowledge of JavaScript or C++, the massive market opportunity around mobility has led to a growing number of online platforms and services that promise a "no coding required" approach to making apps.

Distimo: Games rule, but finance app category heats up

Games may continue to reign supreme as an app category, but the finance category generated almost 71 percent more revenue on Google Play and 42 percent more revenue on the Apple App Store in February compared with January 2014, according to Distimo. 

What a Microsoft takeover of Xamarin would mean

There aren't a lot of ways Microsoft will be able to follow up its recent announcement of Office for the iPad, but confirmation that it will acquire Xamarin would come pretty close. If the rumors are true, though, it would suggest that Microsoft is aggressively moving in a mobile-first direction that leaves much of its legacy baggage behind. 

Advice on the economics of app testing: Skip it and costs add up

Flossing your teeth. Doing your taxes. Testing your app. They may all be chores developers hate, but it's becoming clearer than ever that the last one could really cost them.